Sydney Architecture Images- Central Business District

UTS Information Technologies Engineering Building

architect

Denton Corker Marshall

location

City Campus, on Broadway (between Wattle and Jones Streets)

date

2013

style

Decon

construction

Angled, semi-transparent “binary screens” envelop the winning proposal for the Broadway Building. The screens provide the building with a dramatic urban presence.
They are made of aluminium sheets perforated with binary code, the series of “1s” and “0s” that underpins computer programming language.
The architect’s design concept positions the new building as a single, sculptural object in the city. “Gills” creased into the aluminium plates of the binary screen punctuate the façade and symbolically reinforce the building as a living, breathing structure. A crevasse-like pedestrian atrium runs through the heart of the building, both horizontally and vertically. It will connect the local neighbourhood to the UTS education precinct.

Size: 23,500sqm useable floor area, 14 levels
Expected completion: April 2014
Project team: Greg Graham, Program Management Office (UTS project manager); Denton Corker Marshall (architect and principal consultant); Lend Lease (contractor)

type

Education
Below- Construction images, April 2014.
Below- Construction images, June 2013 (don't think that it will look as glam as the renderings...):
 
 
UTS digital building
Architect- Denton Corker Marshall (DCM)

Denton Corker Marshall (DCM) has been announced as the winner of the UTS architectural competition to design the gateway to UTS’ City Campus, the Broadway Building.
Sited on the corner of Broadway and Wattle Streets, it is hoped the $170 million building will play an important role in the university?s City Campus Master Plan, which aims to create a vibrant and connected education precinct.
The design reads as two “binary screens” tilted together across a crevasse-like pedestrian atrium running through the heart of the building, both horizontally and vertically, connecting the campus to its surrounding neighbourhood. These screens are made of aluminium sheets perforated with binary code. This symbolic design move reflects UTS’ desire to position itself as an institution at the cross roads of technology and creativity, but the screens will also serve a functional role as shading and ventilation.
The design as a whole targets a minimum 5-Star Green Star rating, and it is estimated the binary screens alone will bring a 10 to15 percent operational energy saving. All teaching, learning, research and social spaces are clustered around the internal atrium, providing strong access to daylight and fresh air for staff, students and visitors. The semi-transparent nature of the binary screens also offers visual connections between internal activities and the public domain.
The winning proposal was selected as part of a two-stage competition, run by the university. The first stage of the competition, involving the submission of ideas together with capability statements, received submissions from a wide range of national and high profile international practices (DRAW/BIG, Candalepas Associates/Miralles Tagliabue, and Terroir/ Foreign Office Architects among others). Seven Australian practices were selected to participate in Stage two of the competition, incorporating six teams: Bates Smart, BVN Architecture, Cox Richardson, Denton Corker Marshall, Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp, and Lacoste Stephenson + Daryl Jackson Robin Dyke.
While the competition has been hailed as a positive precedent for Sydney, given it was based upon an initial ideas submission, some described the lack of submissions from any of the smaller architectural practices in the final shortlist as a lost opportunity.
Sydney-based emerging practice Supercolossal established a dedicated webpage to display submissions to the competition that didn?t make the second stage cut. As the website describes: “The competition opened up an opportunity for less established practices to compete for a large public project and introduce new blood (young practices, new practices, practices not normally engaged for university projects) into the arena of public architecture? That none of the practices here made the short-list is disappointing ? there are some great ideas on display.”
DCM’s winning proposal, along with those of the Stage Two finalists and Stage One concept designs, will be published on the official competition website on 17 August 2009.

*Competition website:* [" www.UTSbroadway.com.au  ":http://www.utsbroadway.com.au ]
*Supercolossal’s Broadway competition dedicated webpage:* [" http://supercolossal.ch/utsbroadway.html   ":http://supercolossal.ch/utsbroad
https://www.uts.edu.au/partners-and-community/initiatives/uts-25th-anniversary/future-campus

Link- http://www.australiandesignreview.com/news/743-dcms-digital-vision-wins-uts-comp



Massive shields and gills add shock and awe to UTS
August 1, 2009 SMH Heath Gilmore

A NEW building chosen to ‘‘shock’’ and ‘‘awe’’ Sydneysiders will dominate the western entry into the city.
The ruling body of the University of Technology Sydney last night endorsed the winning competition design for its $170 million, 12-storey building, for its engineering and IT faculty.
With a knowing nod to future controversy, the university vice chancellor, Ross Milbourne, declared the building that will front Broadway as ‘‘the most significant piece of architecture in Sydney since the Opera House’’.
The building will glow and pulsate with embedded light-emitting diodes at night and will create a juxtaposition with its neighbours including the Carlton and United Brewery site, the former Fairfax office block and the brutalist UTS high rise tower.
Massive uneven aluminium shields strike out from the 12-storey building at acute angles, leaving giant gill-like slits to give the impression of a breathing entity. Binary coding – the foundation of computing and telecommunications – is laser-cut into the shields. The square zeros and dashed ones can be translated into ‘‘University of Technology Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology’’.
The walls and roofs visually merge into a single whole sculpture, albeit one with a five-star environmental rating. A giant, crooked crevasse cuts through the middle of the building to allow natural light to flood down on to pedestrians moving through the atrium and connecting internal walkways.
It is entirely funded by the university, although federal support is being sought for the overall master plan to increase the city campus by a third.
Professor Milbourne said he was shocked when he saw the entry by architects Denton Corker Marshall after the design competition jury presented a shortlist of six entries. ‘‘‘We walked into this room and all the panels for the six entries were up,’’ he said. ‘‘The Denton Corker Marshall building shocked me at first. But I kept coming back to it. I kept thinking this is fantastic. It spells out what we are about: technology innovation and creativity.’’
The design jury chairman, Graham Jahn, said the building was sublime and would transform the idea of the naked building. ‘‘It’s a surprising and artistic contribution. Over time it will be enigmatic and timeless,’’ said Mr Jahn, who is the past president of the Australian Institute of Architects and Guide to Sydney Architecture author.
‘‘I think it’s important that the people of Sydney feel confident enough to encourage new works of architecture and art which will redefine the cityscape and add layers of meaning and stimulation. We should reward difference and inventiveness over the pedestrian.’’
UTS has proposed several new buildings, a green, gallery and coffee shops that would be open to the public and new pedestrian walkways that would link the Broadway district with Chinatown and Darling Harbour.
The Sydney Lord Mayor, Clover Moore, saw the design yesterday, and said the building transformed the university, linking it back into the city in an exciting and imaginative way. Her office was impressed with its environmental credentials.
‘‘This is what university buildings should be like – innovative, progressive and sustainable,’’ she said.


Read more:
http://www.smh.com.au/national/massive-shields-and-gills-add-shock-and-awe-to-uts-20090731-e4fa.html#ixzz310RkPcam
 
01. Above- UTS Broadway Building ITE Building. Architect: Denton Corker Marshall.

Angled, semi-transparent “binary screens” envelop the winning proposal for the Broadway Building Design Competition [opens an external site] by architect Denton Corker Marshall. The screens provide the building with a dramatic urban presence. They are made of aluminium sheets perforated with binary code, the series of “1s” and “0s” that underpins computer programming language. The building is also known as the
Information Technology and Engineering (ITE) Building.
Reflecting the final tenant of the building, the binary code reads ‘University of Technology, Sydney Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology.’
The architect’s design concept positions the new building as a single, sculptural object in the city. “Gills” creased into the aluminium plates of the binary screen punctuate the façade and symbolically reinforce the building as a living, breathing structure. A crevasse-like pedestrian atrium runs through the heart of the building, both horizontally and vertically. It will connect the local neighbourhood to the UTS education precinct.
   
  UTS Redevelopment Summary

The base of the 27-storey brutalist concrete UTS tower will be wrapped in an undulating glass facade.

Construction of the new 14-storey faculty ITE Building dramatically sheathed in angular aluminium on the corner of Broadway and Jones Street.



Off Harris Street, the university is also building Australia’s first Frank Gehry building, with its distinctive crumpled facade and treehouse-like skeleton, which caused much controversy when plans were unveiled late last year.
UTS’s Dr Chau Chak Wing building, designed by Frank Gehry, his first Australian project. The 16,030-square-meter (172,545-square-foot) business school building at the University of Technology, Sydney, will have a “treehouse” design, incorporating a core yellow brick and crinkly glass structure, with “branches” spreading away from it, Gehry says.
   
 
  Above- the windows of the refurbished UTS Great Hall
 
 
  02. Above- new student housing
 
  03. Above, proposed new cladding for existing Brutalist podium (I think that this is a mistake- I hope that they don't damage the Brutalist section, as future generations will adore it).
   
  Background to the City Campus Master Plan

A masterplan is a strategic document showing the fundamental principles and processes that guide a future project. The UTS City Campus Master Plan encapsulates our long-term strategic objectives and shows how these can be reached through the intelligent revitalisation of our campus, its buildings and open spaces.

The City Campus Master Plan does not provide design outcomes for any of its proposed projects. Instead, it formulates broad guidelines and principles that will inform future designs (for example, building height, floor space, sustainability goals, etc). All major projects in the masterplan will be subject to separate approvals both by UTS Council and relevant local/state government authorities, such as the Department of Planning and the City of Sydney.

The masterplan was developed by architects Bligh Voller Nield and their consultant team. They were managed by a UTS team who ensured that the architects undertook extensive consultation with senior UTS representatives (including representatives from each faculty and the library). The masterplan was adopted by UTS Council in 2008.

 
Construction starts for UTS City Campus Master Plan
27 Jan 2010

A large-scale expansion and redevelopment of the UTS City campus has begun, with construction underway on a new student housing tower at the rear of the existing Peter Johnson building in Harris St.

NSW Premier Kristina Keneally visited the site last week to announce the Government’s approval of the $427 million Broadway Precinct Concept Plan, a key component of the overall UTS City Campus Master Plan. The concept plan covers four new buildings and a number of major refurbishments, relocations and new social hubs.

Another construction crew is due to arrive on campus before the end of the month to start work on the plan’s second project, a multi-purpose sports hall that will be built underground adjacent to the existing UTS Fitness Centre.

Meanwhile, the detailed design for a new landmark building on Broadway is underway, as is a design competition to extend the podium of the UTS Tower and the adjacent Building 2 to provide new student facilities.

Ms Keneally said the plan includes 58,750 square metres of additional floor space for educational, retail, cultural and sporting uses; more than 25,000 square metres of extra floor space to house 720 students in studio and shared apartments; and an extra 70 bicycle spaces for resident students.

“This redevelopment will allow the University of Technology to further cement its role as a key educational, medical, research and technology centre,” she said.

“The $70 million student accommodation project meets the needs of an increasing student population, but importantly it will also reduce demand for rental housing in the local area, and boost affordability.”

UTS Deputy-Vice Chancellor (Resources) Patrick Woods said the approval had given the green light to change the face of education at UTS. “As well as improving facilities for our students and staff, our plans are also aimed at making UTS more accessible to the local community. By establishing better pedestrian networks, we want to invite our neighbours onto campus to take advantage of new facilities such as the proposed gallery, cinema, café and retail spaces.”

Under the planning approval, the university has committed to:

Maximising retail, student union and other activities at ground level, increasing the activation of the street frontage
Maximising pedestrian access into and through the site
Offsetting overshadowing through improved building frontages, better defined street edges and other public domain works, and
Achieving very high environmental performance ratings for its academic buildings
The multi-purpose sports hall will be the first project completed under the master plan, in time for the start of semester one next year. The student housing tower is scheduled for completion by the end 2011.

—————————–

Student Housing Tower and Building 6 podium extension

Project description
This new residential tower will rise from the existing Building 6 podium. The provision of 720 student beds, spread across the 13-level tower, will resolve UTS’s longstanding lack of on-campus student accommodation. To build the new tower, the university will extend the existing Building 6 podium to create new teaching, learning and social spaces for staff and students.

By bringing students directly onto campus, UTS will provide a more vibrant social atmosphere to the City Campus week-in, week-out. This accommodation will be a key factor in making UTS a ‘sticky campus’, a place where students come not just to study but socialise and relax as well. The around-the-clock presence of students on campus will also generate increased patronage for local businesses.

Lodged between an apartment complex and the ABC’s commercial tower, the student accommodation design responds to multiple generators. The Harris Street facade presents a syncopated visual rhythm that distinguishes it from its neighbours. The facade comprises irregularly spaced windows of varying width, interspersed with coloured, pre-cast concrete panels. The fully-glazed UPN facade reads as three distinct vertical forms, separated by two voids. The glazed facade solution maximises views to the Sydney CBD.

Programme Dates
•Hoardings within the UPN – 90% Complete (Awaiting Mirvac works to complete)
•Hoardings within UTS – 02/03/10 to 06/03/10
•Concrete base in fill to the lift shaft – Complete
•Jump form commencement – 02/03/10 to 06/03/10
•Level 7 re-location and demolition 02/03/10 – 23/04/10
•Level 5-7 structural works to southern side – 08/03/10 to 23/04/10
•Piling to the transfer wall – TBC but likely 06/03/10
•Structure to Level 3 – 08/03/10 to 30/03/10
Public Documents
•Staff and Student toolkit [pdf, 5.5mb], uploaded 17 February 2010
•Faculty of DAB Staff Forum presentation [pdf, 1.8mb], uploaded 14 December 2009
•Weekly cohabitation meeting updates [links to full list of available documents]
Key features
•The Infill and extension of the CB06 podium will provide 5,950m² of new teaching and social space for UTS
•A roof-top garden with stunning views of the surrounding city district caps the new building
•A new cafe at ground level will help animate the Ultimo Pedestrian Network (UPN)
•Extensive communal facilities on level 8 (above the podium on the UPN side), including theatrette, music room, games room, computer room and outdoor BBQ terrace
•Range of student accommodation including private self-contained studios as well as multi-bedroom units with shared facilities
•The existing Building 6 (CB06), primarily occupied by the Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building (DAB), will remain occupied and operational throughout the construction period
•Most general teaching functions normally held in CB06 will be relocated to other areas within the university

Sustainability features
•Building targets a 5-Star Green Star rating, under multi-residential category
•Predominantly naturally ventilated building with good daylight penetration
•Green construction management practices, including certified environmental management and waste management plans, contribute to the environmental rating
•Prioritisation of environmentally-friendly construction materials
•Building the tower on top of an existing building limits requirement for new foundations and associated carbon-generating activities
Project Data
Size:13-level tower above new and existing podium, 720 student beds, spread over 19,200m²
Project budget:$75 million
Key dates:•Construction start: December 2009 (pending planning approval)
•Estimated Completion: December 2011
Project procurement:Design and Construct contract
Project team:•UTS Project Manager: Campus Development, Planning and Design Review Branch, Facilities Management Unit
•Contractor: Hutchinson Builders
•Architect: Nettleton Tribe
•Harris Street facade architect: Lacoste and Stevenson
•Consultant Team: JBA (town planner), WT Partnership (quantity surveyor), Monaghan Surveyors (surveyor), Viridis E3 (environmental), Halcrow MWT (traffic and parking), Morris-Goding (accessibility consultant), Waterman AHW (ventilation engineers), Acoustic Logic (noise assessment), Windtech (reflectivity and wind environment), Douglas Partners (Geotechnical), BG&E (structural engineers), JD MacDonald (waste management), City Plan Services (BCA), Defire (fire and safety), GDK (hydraulic engineer), Building Services (communications), DSA (BCA, section J)
More Information
Berlin Ng, Senior Planning Officer, Ext. 2823, email: berlin.ng@uts.edu.au

Theodorus Gofers, Senior Project Manager, Ext. 4426, email: Theodorus.Gofers@uts.edu.au

Source- http://www.fmu.uts.edu.au/masterplan/inprogress/02/your-say.html


UTS Broadway Building (ITE Building)
13 Mar

Project description
Angled, semi-transparent “binary screens” envelope the winning proposal for the Broadway Building Design Competition (opens an external site) by architect Denton Corker Marshall. The screens provide the building with a dramatic urban presence. They are made of aluminium sheets perforated with binary code, the series of “1s” and “0s” that underpins computer programming language. The building is also known as the Information Technology and Engineering (ITE) Building.

Reflecting the final tenant of the building, the binary code reads ‘University of Technology, Sydney Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology.’

The architect’s design concept positions the new building as a single, sculptural object in the city. “Gills” creased into the aluminium plates of the binary screen punctuate the façade and symbolically reinforce the building as a living, breathing structure. A crevasse-like pedestrian atrium runs through the heart of the building, both horizontally and vertically. It will connect the local neighbourhood to the UTS education precinct.

A floor-to-roof atrium sits at the heart of the building

Key features
•Internal planning creates strong visual connections through the atrium space and fosters inter-collegial interaction and collaboration
•Vertical planning places most public functions at ground floor level and most private at upper levels
•Academic and research students clustered around interactive and break-out spaces along internal circulation routes
•Internal spaces defined by access to daylight and fresh air
•Building will accommodate some 500 staff and 4,300 students
Sustainability features
•Minimum 5-Star Green Star Rating
•Energy saving strategy is to deliver a 30% – 45% energy saving over benchmark tertiary educational buildings with similar functional spaces.
•45% shading co-efficient of the external ‘binary code’ screen estimated to bring about a 10-15% operational energy saving.
•Other key components include:
-450m² solar array which collects water and provides filtered daylight to atrium
-under floor air distribution system
-low energy lighting
-double-glazed facade with night-purge opening panels

Project Data
Size:27,000sqm useable floor area, 14 levels
Construction value:$170 million
Key dates:
•Design Competition winner announced: July 2009 (opens an external site)
•Construction estimated: mid-2010 to end 2012
Design procurement: Design Excellence Competition (opens an external site)
Project team:
•UTS Project Manager: Campus Development, Planning and Design Review Branch, Facilities Management Unit
•Architect: Denton Corker Marshall

 

www.sydneyarchitecture.com 

links

https://www.uts.edu.au/partners-and-community/initiatives/city-campus-master-plan/projects-progress/broadway-building