Sydney Architecture Images- Central Business District

Smith Copeland Warehouse (former)

architect

Byera Hadley

location

144-150 Clarence Street, Sydney. Part of Paterson Reid and Bruce Ltd Building.

date

1908

style

Federation Warehouse

construction

load bearing brick

type

warehouse
 
 
 
 
   
Statement of Significance:
The building is a fine example of the Federation period warehouse style, showing the typical elements of bold massing, predominant face brick texture and echoes of the Romanesque Revival in elements such as round arched openings (Criterion F.1). Like other surviving warehouse buildings in central Sydney, which are mostly located on the western edge of the central business district, the building has significance in demonstrating the former commercial life of the city centre as a centre of manufacturing and distribution, functions which have mostly abandoned the city centre in recent decades under the pressure of higher value office uses (Criterion A.4).
 
History:
Built 1908 to the design of architect Byera Hadley. Builders were Moodie Brothers.

Description:
This is a nine storey building with a steel and concrete framed structure and a bold and austerely decorated facade of exposed brickwork with stone trims. Prominent pilasters rise the full height of the building dividing the facade into five bays of varying width. Windows are in pairs or threes, some rectangular, some segmental arched. Subtle decoration is provided by stone trims and bullnosed bricks. A simple applied moulded stone arch marks the central front door. At fifth floor level a strong horizontal emphasis is given by an applied stone cornice with brackets and dentilation, while at eighth floor level there are various string courses and arches; above this the top floor terminates in a simple parapet with stone coping and square tops to the pilasters. This division of the facade gives the building a general appearance of having been extended upward in several builds, as was common in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century; but the unified structure and brickwork indicates that this probably did not happen in this case in this building; possibly the visual effect was a deliberate affectation. Two vehicle entrances have been introduced to the ground floor. The interior has been modernised and completely altered by subdivision during the 1980s. The building is now functionally joined back to back to No 83-87 York Street (for information on No 83-87 York Street see RR 001853). This arrangement dates from an unknown time but probably before the latest renovation, as the buildings are shown as a single property under the name Paterson Reid and Bruce on a 1970s Sydney City Council Planning scheme map.
History: Not Available
Condition and Integrity:
The building has been refurbished during the 1980s and appears to be in good condition. The exterior is generally unaltered apart from two vehicle entrances which have been introduced to the ground floor. The interior was not seen. (1990)

Bibliography:
ART & ARCHITECTURE, JANUARY-FEBRUARY 1909.
ROYAL AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, LIST OF 20TH CENTURY
BUILDINGS OF SIGNIFICANCE

 

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