Sydney Architecture Images- Gone but not forgotten

Hotel Metropole

architect

Hennessy and Sheerin

location

frontages on Young, Bent and Phillip streets

date

Built- 1890  Demolished- 1970

style

Victorian Second Empire

construction

Rendered brick Stone

type

Hotel
Summary Hotel Metropole, site later used for the CAGA Centre.
The Hotel Metropole, with frontages on Young, Bent and Phillip streets, was built by the Australian Coffee Palace Company at a cost of 150,000 pounds and opened on the 14th of January, 1890. At the opening ceremony, Mr McBean, chairman of the company, declared it ‘a splendid establishment’ and Mayor Burdekin described the architecture, by Hennessy and Sheerin, as magnificent.
I think the Hotel Metropole was demolished in the late 1960s or early 1970s, and it was a grand old place with a terrific lounge cum tea room that was full of Edwardian cane furniture and other 'gracious' fittings: 'terribly colonial' in the manner of Raffles in Singapore. It was known as the Cockies' Hotel, where all our landed gentry came to stay while In Town.

Above- wow- who knew?? On the left was the Metropole Hotel - demolished late 60s/early 70s, it's successor demolished in 1991 for the current Governor Macquarie Tower. The successor of the building on the right was demolished on 2008 for 1 Bent St ("space")
Above- with the Union Club in the foreground.
Hotel Metropole was demolished in the early seventies to make way for the bland CAGA house. I'm pretty sure CAGA had an intended short life cycle. It was demolished in 1992 to make way for GMT.
 


No more magnificent structure of design or appointment of its type can be found in the colonies, and certainly not in Sydney, than the Hotel Metropole.



Sydney Morning Herald, January 14, 1890.

The Hotel Metropole, with frontages on Young, Bent and Phillip streets, was built by the Australian Coffee Palace Company at a cost of 150,000 pounds and opened on the 14th of January, 1890. At the opening ceremony, Mr McBean, chairman of the company, declared it ‘a splendid establishment’ and Mayor Burdekin described the architecture, by Hennessy and Sheerin, as magnificent.



Along with mosaic tiled floors in the entrance areas and lavish stained glass windows, the building boasted a roof promenade from which, according to the SMH, guests could take in views from the Heads almost to Parramatta. There were 260 guest rooms, several dining rooms, sumptuous furnishings and electric lighting. This photograph, by Kerry & Co, shows that the hotel was conveniently located next to a city tram route.



The Metropole could accommodate more than 300 guests, and its registers recorded some well-known international visitors. Rudyard Kipling spent two nights there during his 1891 trip to Australia. Jack London also stayed there in 1917, later describing the hotel as ‘managed by Barbarians’ because of the night staff’s refusal to provide him with an extra candle by which to write when the light bulb in his room failed.

The Hotel Metropole closed in 1969 and was demolished soon afterwards.

Photography by Kerry & Co

 

www.sydneyarchitecture.com 

links

http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/imageservices/2010/03/the-hotel-metropole/#sthash.TD2KEktU.dpuf