Sydney Architecture Images- Eastern Suburbs

Tyree Energy Technologies Building – UNSW

architect

Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp

location

University of NSW

date

2012

style

Millennium Moderne 

construction

Targeting a 6 Star Green Star design rating, it features a gas-fired tri-generation plant, low energy displacement cooling, heat recovery systems, two thermal labyrinths with 1,100sqm of roof-mounted solar panel array utilising the latest UNSW solar cell technology.

type

University departmental building

 

 
 
The Tyree Energy Technologies Building (TETB) is the new home of energy research at the University of New South Wales, custom designed and constructed by Brookfield Multiplex. The innovative energy and technologies building is located on the last prime site on campus, fronting both Anzac Parade and the University's entry boulevard and serves as a gateway for the campus.

As the new home of energy research at the University of NSW, this landmark, GBCA Green star registered, energy-efficient building will be a state-of-the-art centre for research, education and industry collaboration in the development and practical implementation of sustainable energy technologies.

The Tyree Building laboratories will support the ongoing research of UNSW researchers in world record-breaking solar photovoltaic technologies, sustainable clean fuels, smart grids, energy storage, energy economics and policy analysis. It will also be an educational hub for undergraduate and postgraduate students, providing an optimal learning environment for the expert engineers and analysts who will shape our energy future.

The 16,000 m2 building houses facilities such as wet and dry research laboratories, teaching laboratories, post-graduate write-up spaces, multiple raked theatres, a range of informal learning and collaborative spaces, showcase/exhibition space, a rooftop experimental space and a prototype carbon trading office.

Targeting a 6 Star Green Star design rating, it features a gas-fired tri-generation plant, low energy displacement cooling, heat recovery systems, two thermal labyrinths with 1,100sqm of roof-mounted solar panel array utilising the latest UNSW solar cell technology.

Completed early 2012, the AUD$ 125 million project will support industry collaboration and provide a formal learning space for 300 engineering students. With both a long-term and wide-ranging impact, the UNSW will help position the broader community both locally and nationally, to meet its skills requirements now and into the future, building capacity for innovation in energy.

 

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links

Link- www.storyphotography.com.au
Special thanks to Andrew Chung